7/20/18

Made Sense for a Change


As she logs experience with the deep staters, who inhabit the under Ground, Alice learns what they are up to and what, in general, is the overall Deep State-of-affairs. 

Alice's Adventures under Ground [Original Cover]

The word “wonderland” is defined in the dictionary as an imaginary place "of delicate beauty" or "magical charm," a place that excites "admiration or wonder," "a scenic place." Alice's trip can hardly be described with those words. She stumbled into some "Otherland," which is 180 degrees opposite to the dictionary's flowery definition of the word "Wonderland." Alice’s dream is a nightmare, not a lullaby. Alice’s adventure is a trip into an asylum, not into a “place of delicate beauty.”

Lewis Carroll dreams up a cast of wacky characters, each suffering from one or more mental disorders. The author paints Alice into an imaginary, upside-down world, where time runs backward and insanity is accepted as normal.

Alice's Adventures under Ground [Original Cover]

Alice’s Adventures under Ground is the original title of Lewis Carroll’s first “Alice book,” whose title later morphed into Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Now it is Alice In Wonderland.

Carroll's first choice,“under Ground,” is the best title. It is earthy, scary, dark, even dirty. Deep in the underground, Alice encounters a cast of dysfunctional characters––Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat, a pipe-smoking caterpillar, Red Queen. Humpty Dumpty, and Tweedledum and Tweedledee––all surviving in a dystopian world of conundrums and contradictions. Hardly a “wonderland!” 

The word “wonderland” is defined in the dictionary as an imaginary place "of delicate beauty" or "magical charm," a place that excites "admiration or wonder," "a scenic place." Alice's trip can hardly be described with those words. She stumbled into some "Otherland," which is 180 degrees opposite to the dictionary's flowery definition of the word "Wonderland." Alice’s dream is a nightmare, not a lullaby. Alice’s adventure is a trip into an asylum, not into a “place of delicate beauty.”

Lewis Carroll dreams up a cast of wacky characters, each suffering from one or more mental disorders. The author paints Alice into an imaginary, upside-down world, where time runs backward and insanity is accepted as normal.

How did Lewis Carroll's macabre funny-farm evolve (or, devolve?) into a beloved cast of nursery rhyme characters? Walt Disney can be lauded or blamed for sugar-coating Carroll’s madhouse in the 1951 Disney animation––Alice in Wonderland. Hollywood's Technicolor film recasts Carroll’s mentally "deranged" psychos into cuddly characters for kids to take to bed to ward off nightmares. What Hollywood fails to expose to Alice's fans is that Disney's cuddly characters are reincarnations of Lewis Carroll's crazy cast.


The themes of the Alice story are identity and growth, even when surrounded by chaos. Alice asks, "Who in the world am I?" Alice not only grows ten feet tall, she manages to mature as a result of her adventures in the under Ground. She exits the underground more grown up than when she first stumbled into the hare hole. It was all a dream. Alice's dream. Lewis Carroll's dream, Disney's dream. The underground's dream. Now, if you wish, it can be your dream.